Category: terminal

How to Clear Icon Cache on Mac

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Occasionally, Mac users may notice that icons in the Finder of MacOS or the Dock of MacOS either display as generic icons, or the icons do not align with what they should (for example, seeing a generic document icon instead of a PDF thumbnail, or seeing a VLC icon instead of a zip archive icon, or seeing a generic application icon rather than Safari icon).

If you experience an issue with the icon display on the Mac, you can manually clear the icon cache, which will force the icon cache to rebuild, thereby resolving the inaccurate display of icons on the Mac.

How…

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How to Check SHA512 Checksum on Mac

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SHA512 hashes are often used to determine data integrity, whether for matching a downloaded file to an original on a server, or for command output, or to make sure a file transfer was successful, or not tampered with.

Checking a SHA512 hash is pretty easy on a Mac, thanks to bundled command line tools that are preinstalled on any semi-modern MacOS installation. We’ll cover two different methods to check and verify SHA512 hash on the Mac, using both the shasum command, and openssl command.

How to Check & Verify SHA512 checksum with shasum

MacOS includes the…

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Easily Bulk Download & Install Mac Apps with macapps.link

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Ready to automate Mac app downloads and installs? If you’re setting up a new Mac, you probably know how tedious it is to manually navigate to a bunch of different developer websites, and to individually download and install all the Mac apps you may want. This is a necessary but time consuming procedure for setting up a new Mac, particularly when you’re using apps not found on the Mac App Store.

And here is where the MacApps.link service comes in handy, by bundling a bunch of different Mac applications of your choosing together into a single executable command…

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Enable Low Power Mode on Mac via Command Line

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If you are a Mac laptop user and you spend a lot of time at the command line, you may appreciate knowing that you can enable Low Power Mode on a Mac laptop through a terminal command.

Enabling Low Power Mode through the command line on a MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and MacBook is the same end result as if you toggled Low Power on through the macOS Battery preferences, except of course that you never have to leave the comfort of the terminal. You can also enable Low Power Mode through the Terminal, then turn it off from System Preferences, or vice versa.


For the…

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How to Install nano Text Editor on Mac Again

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If you have attempted to use nano at the command line on MacOS recently, you may have noticed that the pico text editor is launched instead, via a symlink for /usr/bin/nano to pico. This is because the latest versions of MacOS remove the nano text editor from the command line for whatever reason, and instead have replaced nano with pico.

If you prefer to use the nano text editor, you can get nano back in the command line by installing it manually yourself.

The simplest way to install the nano text editor on MacOS is to use Homebrew.

How to Install nano Text…

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Run Shortcuts from the Command Line on Mac

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The Mac includes a command line interface to run and interact with Shortcuts app. This could be potentially useful to some macOS users who rely on the Shortcuts app for scripting and automation, and who spend a lot of time in the Terminal

The currently available shortcuts command line flags include ‘run’, ‘list’, ‘view’, and ‘sign’, but note that with the exception of ‘list’, they will all launch the Shortcuts app in the GUI on the Mac.

How to Run Shortcuts from Command Line on Mac

From the Terminal, use the following syntax:

shortcuts run...

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Merge Multiple Terminal Windows into Tabs on Mac

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Have a bunch of Terminal windows open on your Mac that’d you like to merge into a single tabbed window? No problem, you can stop juggling several different terminal windows and get them all sorted out into a nice and easy to manage single tabbed window, thanks to a handy feature built into the Terminal app.

You’ll need to have at least two terminal windows open to be able to use the merge windows feature in Terminal app for Mac. This feature gets potentially more useful with the more windows you have open, but if you just want to try it out yourself open a…

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Making Python 3 Default in MacOS

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Python users on the Mac are likely aware that Python is being deprecated from macOS 12.3 onward, and will no longer be preinstalled on the Mac. But Python remains an incredibly popular programming language, and if you rely on Python you’ll likely want to continue to have Python available in macOS. It’s easy to get Python 3 on the Mac, so let’s go a step further and show you how you can make Python 3 the new default Python version in macOS, whenever the python command is executed.

Installing Python 3 on the Mac

If you already installed Python 3 on the Mac

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How to Get a Split Terminal on Mac

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Want a vertically split set of Terminals on the Mac, so that you can have two concurrent terminals running side by side for executing their own commands? Of course you do, this is a staple feature of many terminal apps for linux and unix command lines, so having this feature on the Mac is a necessity for many advanced users.

There are a few ways to achieve a split terminal result on the Mac, but perhaps the easiest method is by using a feature native to MacOS called Split View, which, as you probably guessed, allows you to run two applications or two windows…

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