Category: terminal

Take Full Webpage Screenshots on Mac via Command Line with webkit2png

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Ever needed to take a full webpage scrolling screenshot on the Mac through the command line?

While there are various approaches to taking full webpage screenshots on a Mac easily with Firefox or another browser, and many ways to take screenshots on the Mac, including taking screenshots from the Terminal, none of the native options are quite as simple for capturing full page screenshots of websites as the simple approach offered on iPhone or iPad. But if you’re a Terminal user, you can accomplish the task pretty easily with a tool called webkit2png.

This is a…

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How to Clear DNS Cache in MacOS Ventura & MacOS Monterey

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Mac users may need to occasionally clear out and flush DNS cache in MacOS, perhaps because they modified their hosts file, or for troubleshooting purposes.

Resetting DNS cache on the Mac is generally only needed by advanced users, but even novice Mac users should find the process to be pretty easy, though it is achieved through the use of the command line.

How to Flush DNS Cache in MacOS Ventura & MacOS Monterey

Here’s how to clear out and reset your DNS cache in modern MacOS versions:

  1. Open the Terminal application on the Mac, the simplest way to do this is…

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How to Open Google Chrome from Terminal on Mac

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Command line users may encounter situations where they’d like to open the Google Chrome web browser directly from the Terminal on the Mac.

Opening GUI applications from the command line is easy on MacOS, and the command syntax to do so has been the same since the beginning of Mac OS X, so regardless of what system software version you are using you’ll find this trick to work.

Opening Google Chrome from the Command Line on Mac

The syntax to open Google Chrome from the terminal is as follows:

open -a "Google Chrome.app"

Hit return as usual to execute the…

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How to Allow Apps to be Downloaded & Opened from Anywhere on MacOS Ventura

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Wondering how you can allow apps to be downloaded and opened from anywhere on MacOS Ventura? You may have noticed the ability to select “Allow applications downloaded from anywhere” has been removed by default in macOS Ventura and other modern versions of MacOS. This does not mean it’s impossible to download and open apps from elsewhere however, and advanced users can enable this feature within System Settings if they need to on their Mac.

Note making changes to Gatekeeper has security and privacy ramifications, and is only appropriate for advanced users…

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How to Rename & Move Files with Spaces in Name at Command Line

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If you’re new to the Mac command line you may have come across a situation where you’re trying to interact with a file that has spaces in the name, for example “This File.txt” but as you probably discovered, you can’t simply type the file name if there are spaces within the file name, or the command to move, rename, copy, or otherwise interact with the file will fail to execute.

There are a few ways to interact with files from Terminal that have spaces in the file names, but one is arguably easier to remember and use than the other.


We’re focusing on…

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Hosts File Not Working on Mac? Try This Fix

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Some Mac users have discovered that the hosts file in MacOS does not appear to work, or changes to the /etc/hosts file on the Mac are seemingly ignored. Given that the hosts file is used to map IP addresses to host names, and is frequently modified by advanced users, this is an understandably annoying problem.

This is fairly obvious issue when it happens, because after editing the hosts file on a Mac from the command line or even with TextEdit, and flushing DNS cache, there does not appear to be any change to hosts.

Changes to the hosts file being ignored, or…

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How to Download iCloud Photos via the Command Line

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Ever wanted to download all photos from iCloud Photos using the command line? Thanks to the third party icloud_photos_downloader tool, you can do just that. Called icloudpd for short, it works to access and download photos directly from iCloud using the command line on a Mac, Windows PC, or Linux.

icloudpd is open source, and you can check out the source project on github if interested.

Because icloud_photos_downloader is a Python tool, you will need to have installed Python 3.x or installed Homebrew on the Mac if you haven’t done so already. We’re going to…

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How to Clear Icon Cache on Mac

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Occasionally, Mac users may notice that icons in the Finder of MacOS or the Dock of MacOS either display as generic icons, or the icons do not align with what they should (for example, seeing a generic document icon instead of a PDF thumbnail, or seeing a VLC icon instead of a zip archive icon, or seeing a generic application icon rather than Safari icon).

If you experience an issue with the icon display on the Mac, you can manually clear the icon cache, which will force the icon cache to rebuild, thereby resolving the inaccurate display of icons on the Mac.

How…

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How to Check SHA512 Checksum on Mac

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SHA512 hashes are often used to determine data integrity, whether for matching a downloaded file to an original on a server, or for command output, or to make sure a file transfer was successful, or not tampered with.

Checking a SHA512 hash is pretty easy on a Mac, thanks to bundled command line tools that are preinstalled on any semi-modern MacOS installation. We’ll cover two different methods to check and verify SHA512 hash on the Mac, using both the shasum command, and openssl command.

How to Check & Verify SHA512 checksum with shasum

MacOS includes the…

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