Category: Command Line

Make an Intel Mac Boot Directly to Startup Manager

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If you have an Intel Mac, you can make it boot directly into the boot disk options startup manager by issuing an nvram terminal command. This could be helpful for advanced users in particular whether they’re troubleshooting, have dual boot situations with multiple versions of macOS, macOS and Windows 10 in Boot Camp, macOS and Linux, for accessing a USB boot drive, a Time Machine restore disk, or myriad other situations where you’d want to boot a Mac directly into the startup manager.

Whether or not this is easier or faster than booting an Intel Mac from an…

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How to Update Homebrew on Mac

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Want to update Homebrew and your packages? Of course you do! Homebrew is a popular package manager for Mac that easily allows users to install and manage command line tools, apps, and utilities, typically familiar with the Linux and Unix world. Because it’s a package manager, you won’t need to manually build anything from source either. Of course like any other software, Homebrew itself along with the command line tools get updated, so you might be wondering how to update Homebrew, and how to upgrade Homebrew packages to newer versions.

We’ll cover the…

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How to Make a MacOS Big Sur ISO File

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Some advanced users may wish to create an ISO file of the macOS Big Sur installer file (or MacOS Catalina installer, or MacOS Mojave installers for that matter). These can be useful for installing MacOS into virtual machines like VirtualBox and VMWare, and because the resulting installer is an ISO file it can be helpful for creating an alternative installer media whether on an SD Card, external hard drive, USB flash key, or similar, especially when the typical approach to creating a bootable USB installer drive for MacOS Big Sur is not viable or possible.

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How to Run Homebrew & x86 Terminal Apps on M1 Macs

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If you’re one of the early adopters who acquired an M1 Apple Silicon Mac and find that Homebrew and many other x86 terminal apps don’t yet have support for the new Arm architecture, you’ll be happy to know there’s a fairly simple workaround.

The trick is to run a parallel Terminal application through Rosetta. And yes that means you’ll need to install Rosetta on the Apple Silicon Mac first, if you haven’t done so already.

How to Run x86 Homebrew & Terminal Apps on Apple Silicon Macs

Here’s the workaround until native support arrives:

  1. Locate the…

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How to Copy at Command Line Showing Progress & Speed Indicator

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Ever wished you could see the transfer progress and speed of copying files at the command line? If you’re familiar with the command line of Mac OS, Linux, or any other Unix operating system, you likely use the ‘cp’ or ditto commands to copy files, directories, and other data. The ditto and cp command is great, but one downside is that cp does not include a progress indicator, and that’s what we’re going to resolve here by creating an alias to use an rsync command with a progress indicator to copy data at the command line.


Obviously this is aimed at…

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How to Create macOS Big Sur Beta Bootable USB Install Drive

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Advanced Mac users often want to make a boot disk installer for macOS Big Sur beta, allowing for something like a USB flash drive to be used to boot and install macOS Big Sur onto any compatible Mac.

Bootable MacOS installer USB drives provide for the ability to clean install macOS Big Sur, update to macOS Big Sur, install macOS Big Sur beta onto multiple Macs without redownloading the installer, as well as the ability to use Disk Utility to partition and erase a machine, perform Time Machine restorations, and more.

If you’re interested in creating a macOS Big…

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How to Convert a MacOS Installer to ISO

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Advanced Mac users may wish to convert a MacOS Installer application into an ISO file. Typically the resulting installer ISO files are used for installing macOS into virtual machines like VMWare or VirtualBox, but they can also be used to burn the ISO to media to create a boot disk. This offers an alternative to creating a bootable USB flash drive for MacOS installers as well.

This tutorial will walk through the steps to create an ISO file of a MacOS installer.


In this particular walkthrough, we’ll be converting a MacOS Mojave installer application into an…

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How to Create a Bootable MacOS Catalina Installer Drive

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Some Mac users may wish to create a bootable MacOS Catalina installer drive, typically using a USB flash drive or with another similar small boot disk.

Bootable USB installers offer an easy way to upgrade multiple Macs to macOS Catalina, to perform clean installs of MacOS Catalina, to perform maintenance from a boot disk like formatting disks, modifying disk partitions, and performing restorations, and much more.

We’ll walk through how to create a boot USB install drive for MacOS Catalina 10.15.

Requirements to Create a Bootable macOS Catalina USB Install…

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How to List All Cron Jobs on a Mac or Linux PC

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Need to quickly see a list of all cron jobs on a computer? You can easily see all scheduled cron jobs by using the crontab command, and seeing cron data works the same on Mac as well as Linux and most other unix environments too.

Perhaps you have a script or task running and you’re trying to track it down, or perhaps you’re just curious and want to show all crontab for any other reason. Read on to learn how to show all cron jobs for all users, as well as for specific users on a computer.

How to Show All Cron Jobs

At the Terminal or command line, enter the…

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How to Enable Startup Boot Sound Chime on Newer Macs

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Want to re-enable the startup boot chime sound effect on a new Mac? You can do that with a command line string entered into the Macs Terminal. As you may know, new Macs default to not making a startup boot chime sound effect, this is in contrast to every prior Mac model which included a boot sound effect.

With a little effort, you can enable the boot startup sound effect on modern Macs however, including newer model MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, MacBook, iMac, Mac mini, and Mac Pro.

How to Enable Startup Chime on Macs

Here is how you can enable the Mac startup boot…

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